Galleries

Primo Italiano

I know! It has been a while since my last post Sydney events and I am way behind. It has been a busy month for me, making my short film with Metro Screen. Do you think it is a fair excuse?

This Sydney’s Primo Italiano celebrates the first Little Italy here. Stanley Street, East Sydney, is a cluster of cool restaurants and cafés but not really necessary representing Italian community any more. Nevertheless, the event has the vibes of its own, especially, the afternoon light that shines on the crowd is magical. Therefore I focus more on candid of the people. Not a bad day to spend.

Up There

Up There

On a balcony.

Sold

Watching the Future

On the street.

Cover Girls

Cover Girls Cover Girls

Street performance by Cover Girls.

Say Cheese

At Cafe

Sushi Girl

Florist

At shops and stalls.

Trio

Guitarist

Accordionist

Violinist

Frank Bennett

On Stage.

Enjoy the Music

Behind bars.

African Beats

Marrickville is one of most ethnically diverse areas in Australia. The Council organises several events through out the year to reflect the richness of the community including African Cultural Event. At Petersham Town Hall, people gather to see the line-up performances from Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Ethiopia, Guinea and Zimbabwe. The pounding rhythm beats everyone’s hearts.

Igbo

Igbo Leader

Dance

Mask

Trance

Trance

Igbo Cultural Group dance performance.

Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone

Dance by Sierra Leone Cultural Group Marrickville.

Dereb

Ethiopian Dereb Desalegn singing.

Guinea

Guinea

Music and Dance of Guinea with Mory Traore.

Chris Dugu

Back up Chris Dugu

Finale

Zimbabwe Chris Dugu and his band performing as the finale and the crowd getting up and dancing.

Thailand Grand Festival 2007

Thai community in Sydney is celebrating their New Year culture, Songkran, at Thailand Grand Festival 2007 at Tumbalong Park, Darling Harbour on 15th April. Buddhist ceremony has been conducted in the morning. It is time for entertainment in the afternoon. However, unlike in Thailand, no water is not traditionally flushed away. Stage performances line up to please the crowd.

Ribbon Minister

Minister of Juvenile Justice & Minister of Western Sydney, Barbara Perry, opening the Festival.

Thai Hospitality Thai Hospitality

Thai reception girls.

Thai Music Thai Music Thai Music Thai Music

Thai classical music by the Bangkok Octave band of BTCL School.

Decoration

Thai mobile flower decoration.

Phonleb Phonleb Phonleb

Thai traditional dance performance, Phonleb (ฟ้อนเล็บ).

Khun-In

Contemporary Thai musid performance by Khun-In.

Nohrah-Malagus Nohrah-Malagus

Thai traditional dance performance, Nohrah-Malagus (โนราห๋-มาลากัส), by Thai Classical Group.

Fun

A Thai man dancing with fun.

Heritage Heritage Heritage Heritage Heritage

Fashion show, The Heritage of Thailand.

For the King

People wearing yellow shirts to pay respect to the King of Thailand.

Thai New Year Buddhist Ceremony

The biggest event of the year in Thailand has to be Songkran Festival, Thai New Year celebration. Anyone who has been to Thailand during the event must know how crazy it is there. Thai community here in Sydney celebrates its the occasion mildly. Officially, the word Songkran is not used at Thailand Grand Festival 2007 at Tumbalong Park, Darling Harbour on 15th April. Traditionally, the key element of the event is about water: drizzling light perfume on a Buddha image, pouring water onto elders’ palms and water fight on the streets. It would be very messy and not look good if City of Sydney allowed water to be flushed away during the water crisis in Australia and it is hard to call Songkran without water taking part. A part from that, the organiser, Radio Thailand-Stage Management, tries to keep the community feels at home and interested Sydneysiders get amazed by having a Buddhist ceremony in the morning, stage entertainment in the afternoon and Thai food and craft all day long.

The day begins with the people gathering in front of the Buddha then Buddhist monks arrive and settle on the ceremonial stage. Led by the Master of Ceremony, they pray, chant and meditate. Although they have to strive for meditation in the strong sunny morning.

The Buddha

The Main Buddha Image

The Main Buddha Image

The Monks

Monks and the City

Monks leading the ceremony.

Camera Monk

A monk and a camera man in the Buddhist ceremony. The new Thai Consul-General is in the middle of the frame under the shade of a rainbow camera.

Prayers

Praying monks in the Buddhist ceremony.

Dhamakaya

A monk’s belongings: an alms-bowl and an offering-cloth. The the text in Thai and the graphic is Dhamakaya Foundation. They are a reformed Buddhism movement in Thailand.

The Followers

Pranom Pranom

People during the Buddhist ceremony.

The Offerings

One of the core practices in Theravada Buddhism is about merit-making and giving seems to be the easiest way for lay people to achieve the sake of next life. After the meditation session, the monks come off the stage to the people and grant them the chance to give their offerings.

Packaging

Food prepared as the offerings to the monks.

Interacting

The joy of give and take.

Collecting

Piles of food that has been offered to the monks.

The Worship

The morning ceremony is over. Some Buddhist traditions are in service in the afternoon.

Two Buddhas

After the Buddhist ceremony, the main Buddha image is moved inside Tumbalong Park.

Buddha Bath

Thai New Year tradition, bathing a Buddha image.

Revere

The main Buddha image for the crowd to come over and pay respect.

Thai community is one of many ethnic groups in the multicultural Sydney. The religious ceremony plays the essential role in the event and in reflecting their identity. The other parts are entertainments and socialising which we will be looking at them in the next post.

‘Pong