Tag Archives: urban wildlife

Disrupted

Disrupted

I have not posted birds for a while for many different reasons. In fact, this is the first time in months I am out photographing urban wildlife. While this laughing kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) is watching for prey, a noisy miner (Manorina melanocephala)—they are annoyingly territorial by nature—squeaks and swoops to chase it away. But the kookaburra confidently stands still, at least, until the miner backs off. Then it moves to another spot to catch some caterpillas for the meal. Good on ya!

Long-billed Corella

Long-billed Corella

In the same flock of corellas in Victoria Park, Sydney, some of them are distinctively different with pink splashes on their throats. Obviously, there is another life form in the group, the long-billed corellas (Cacatua tenuirostris). I begin to wonder why these two birds are grouping together in the urban environment. They are clearly closer cousins in the cockatoo family (Cacatuidae) than the somewhat more urbanised sulphur-crested cockatoos (Cacatua galerita). They are all social birds, anyway.

Like little corellas, their distribution in Australia has crossed into the city, only much smaller and just in the Sydney area, regarding Wikipedia.

This old one is isolated from the others. While the rest is called out and go to the trees, it still is picking grass seeds from the ground. It lets me approach close to get these shots, so close that I can notice a tag on its foot. Apparently, it is experienced being photographed.

Little Corellas

Little Corellas

At first, by the their squeaks and white bodies in the distance, I thought they were a flock of sulphur-crested cockatoos,  somewhat urbanised feathered friends. But it turns out that these birds, hanging around in Victoria Park, Sydney, are Corellas, close cousins in the same cockatoo family (Cacatuidae). This particular couple is Little Corellas (Cacatua sanguinea).

According to the 1986 edition of Simpson and Day’s Field Guide to the Birds of Australia, their range was just the inland outback and along the coast of Western Australia, Northern Territory and some of the North Queensland. However, the current edition and the Wikipedia say they are in east coast urban areas such as Cairns, Brisbane and Sydney too. This is quite fascinating for me to see wildlife migration to the cities. It reminds me how humans have effected the lives of others in the system.