Tag Archives: urban landscape

One Cold Morning in Murmansk

The first day I arrived in Russia, my first impression of Murmansk was the apartment buildings or Khrushchyovka (хрущёвка). What I see was patterns that seemed to be the same but each block was different either by age of the buildings  or residents decorating them. That, to me, created some vibrants to the city even though it looked straight hard on the surface. This Russia trip got me excited already.

The next morning, I  wander out to see the city. It was pretty cold and snowy. I could only walk around for 30 minutes when fingers and toes started to get numb. But it was enough to get a quick sense of lives of the locals through the morning commutes.

On the same day, we would be on the road to Teriberka. It was something to remember. That’s on next post.

Morning Train to Bangkok

As soon as I got up on the train from Chiang Mai, my focus was almost immediately on the changing landscapes outside the window—from Ayutthaya Station right up Hua Lamphong Station. It was an enjoyable mixed bag of urban creep sceneries to see.

In Ayutthaya, there was a rhythm of rice fields and industrial estates emerging from the light of dawn. Then they started to work on the new Dark Red Line suburban commuter train in Rungsit. Don Muang was the mark that it had entered Bangkok with the old International Airport. Along the way, there was Bangkok’s Stonehenge, which became street artists’ heaven. It went through the train depot in Bang Sue, which would be the last clear horizon perspective from the train. Finally, while it was approaching the final destination in Hua Lamphong, Bangkok from the train view turned into dense communities.

By the time the train arrived Bangkok, the camera phone and the spare powerbank almost ran out of their power and I got very exhausted with the travelling and everything. But it was all really worth it.

All the shot was taken with an iPhone. The music “Sunburn” by Lee Rosevere trough Creative Commons license BY-NC 4.0

On the Road: Facades of Si Chiang Mai

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One thing I could not really afford to miss in Si Chiang Mai, where I spent the first night of the trip was to run along the Mekong River. It was a nice way to explore the town. I used to come here on school breaks but had no memory about this place.

The first thing that struck me was the façades of the houses by the river. They were like time stamps of architectures such as temples, wooden and concrete shophouses.

I was told that the town used to be very busy because it was right opposite to Vientiane, the capital of Laos. People used to get across the vast river by ferry. But that slowly died out when the Thai-Lao Friendship Bridge opened in the 90’s.

That could be one of the reasons why you could variety of house styles along the strip.

Traces of Entertainment

Traces of Entertainment

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The place we stayed in Newcastle is just across the road from this demolished site. From what I explored, it use to be a complex of: a boxing gym, a pub, a bottle shop and a food shop. It apparently was a background of Marcus Westbury’s interview with State Line and a place for some blokes and pigeons to live in.